Fun facts about cancer genetics at Lancaster General Health: Our cancer genetics program was founded by Drs. Randall Oyer and Susan Domchek in November 2007, and we have seen over 5,000 patients since that time. We have grown from providing only germline testing for breast and ovarian cancer to providing germline and somatic testing for all cancers! Our cancer genetics team is fully integrated with the Cancer Risk Evaluation Program and the Basser Center for BRCA Research at Penn Medicine, with whom we participate in weekly clinical genetics conferences.

Caroline Malpass, Genetic Counselor

Caroline Malpass, Genetic Counselor

Education and training

  • Earned B.S. in Biology and Sociology from Bridgewater College in 2015
  • Earned M.S. in Human Genetics from Sarah Lawrence in 2017
  • Clinical rotations in prenatal, pediatric and cancer genetics

The cancer genetic counselor’s role in cancer care

We meet with patients and families with a history of cancer and facilitate genetic testing. We help to interpret genetic test results and explain to patients how their genetics impact their risk for cancer and their family’s risk for cancer. We focus on how genetic testing can give families the opportunity to be preventive and proactive.

The most important changes in clinical cancer genetics over the past year

The criteria for genetic testing continues to broaden – which means more and more patients are eligible to consider genetic testing. The cost of genetic testing continues to drop, which means that genetic testing is more affordable and accessible to our patients and families.

The best way to reach me

Caroline.malpass@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

 

Nina Morvin Genetic Counselor

Nina Morvin, Genetic Counselor

Education and training

  • Graduated from Philadelphia University with a B.S. in Biochemistry with a concentration in Genetics in 2016
  • Graduated from Thomas Jefferson University with a Master’s in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling in 2021
  • Clinical rotations in prenatal, pediatric, general adult, cancer and cardiovascular genetics

The cancer genetic counselor’s role in cancer care

We talk with patients who have a personal or family history of cancer to help them understand hereditary contributions to cancer. Through analysis of personal and family history, we help facilitate patient decision-making surrounding genetic testing.

The most important changes in clinical cancer genetics over the past year

I would say that over the past year, studies continue to shed light on cancer treatment options for those identified to have specific types of germline mutations. Cancer genetic counselors are increasing their impact by linking physicians and cancer patients with the information needed to influence cancer treatment. 

The best way to reach me

Nina.Morvin@pennmedicine.upenn.edu