Bake with Sugar Substitutes to Reduce Calories, Sugar and Carbs in your Favorite Treats

Mother and daughter baking

Baking with a sugar substitute can be a helpful way to decrease the calories, sugar, and carbohydrate content of some of your favorite treats. The following are some tips for using sugar substitutes in baked goods.

Sucralose (SPLENDA®)

Though there are many sugar substitutes available on the market, generally sucralose is one of the easier ones to use for baking. When using sucralose (granulated in bulk rather than packets) in place of granulated sugar, use a 1-to-1 ratio. Therefore, for every cup of sugar you would use 1 cup of sucralose. Be sure you are using the right product since there are sucralose blends which contain regular sugar.

Flavor

To enhance flavor, add an additional teaspoon of vanilla extract for each cup of sugar substitute you use.

Texture

Try using an 8-inch round pan instead of the 9-inch round pan to achieve a better rise when baking cakes or pies. Also, adding a half cup of dry milk powder and an extra half teaspoon of baking soda per one cup of sugar substitute may help.

Nutrient Comparison for Pumpkin Pie using SPLENDA®

Regular Calories Total Carb Grams of Sugar
1 - 9” pie crust 949 85g 0g
1 can (15oz) pumpkin 135 34g 14g
¾ c. sugar 580 150g 150g
2 T. cornstarch 30 14g 0g
Spices - - -
½ c. Half & Half 158 5g 0g
½ c. egg substitute 105 0g 0g
3 T. heavy cream 150 1g 0g
Total 2,117 289g 164g
Per 1/8 slice: 264 36g 20g
Reduced Sugar Calories Total Carb Grams of Sugar
1 - 9” pie crust 949 85g 0g
1 can (15oz) pumpkin 135 34g 14g
¾ c. SPLENDA® No Calorie sweetener 0 0g 0g
2 T. cornstarch 30 14g 0g
Spices - - -
½ c. Half & Half 158 5g 0g
½ c. egg substitute 105 0g 0g
3 T. heavy cream 150 1g 0g
Total 1,537 139g 14g
Per 1/8 slice: 192 17g 2g

If you are trying to watch your calorie or carbohydrate intake this holiday, using a sugar substitute when baking can be beneficial. In the above comparison, using a sugar substitute to bake a pumpkin pie reduced the calorie content by almost 30%, carbohydrate content by 50%, and the sugar content by 90%.

However, remember if you have diabetes you aren’t solely looking at sugar content (so don’t be deceived by that 90% reduction). Be sure to use the total carbohydrate content as your guide since all carbohydrates will break down into sugar in the body. The sugar substitute is still beneficial in this situation as it decreased the carbohydrate content over 50%.

author name

Gabrielle Nichisti, RD, LDN

Gabrielle Nichisti, RD, LDN, is a registered dietitian with the Diabetes and Nutrition Center at Lancaster General Health.

Education: A graduate of the Pennsylvania State University, Nichisti values both education and counseling to connect with her patients. Passionate about leading an enjoyable, healthy lifestyle, Nichisti strives to help others overcome obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

Call: 717-544-5923

About LG Health Hub

The LG Health Hub features breaking medical news and straightforward advice to help individuals of all ages make healthy choices and reach their wellness goals. The blog puts articles by trusted Lancaster General Health clinical experts, good 'n healthy recipes, videos, patient stories, and health risk assessments at your fingertips.

 

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