Does your child have a heart problem?

Young boy playing baseball

Children can experience many different kinds of heart problems—everything from congenital heart defects present at birth to viruses that impact the heart. What symptoms could indicate a problem? When should parents be concerned? Following, is a list of the most common symptoms that might indicate a heart problem in your child.

In most cases, children with the symptoms outlined below don't have heart problems. For instance, some children naturally sweat more, and many children sweat while they sleep. Palpitations may be caused by caffeine. Dizziness may suggest that your child isn't drinking enough fluid.

However, if your child has any of these symptoms, it's important to tell your pediatrician or primary care doctor. He or she will listen to your child's heart and make a full medical evaluation, and then decide whether a referral to a pediatric cardiologist is appropriate.

Infants

  • Getting out of breath with feeds
  • Getting sweaty with feeds
  • Turning blue inside the mouth (gums/tongue)
  • Passing out

Toddlers/Children

  • Unable to keep up physically with other children
  • Getting out of breath with activity sooner than other children
  • Getting sweaty with activity sooner than other children
  • Turning blue around the gums/tongue
  • Passing out

Older Children/Teens

  • Unable to keep up physically with other children
  • Getting out of breath with activity sooner than other children
  • Getting sweaty with exercise sooner than other children
  • Turning blue around the gums/tongue
  • Chest pain with exercise
  • Passing out
  • Palpitations — heart skipping a beat or beating abnormally
  • Dizziness with exercise
author name

Marie M Gleason MD

Marie M. Gleason, MD, is Director, Outpatient and Community Cardiology and Associate Chief, Division of Cardiology at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Gleason is also Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at The Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.

Education: Medical School—New York University; Residency/Fellowship—Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Call: 717-544-0375

About LG Health Hub

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